What to do After You Hit a Parked Car: How Hitting a Parked Car Affects Your Insurance Rates

What to do After You Hit a Parked Car: How Hitting a Parked Car Affects Your Insurance Rates

If you’re one of the many drivers who has ever accidentally hit a parked car, you may be wondering what to do next. It’s important to follow the right steps so that you don’t make the situation worse and end up with higher insurance rates.

This article will walk you through the steps of what to do after hitting a parked car and discuss how accidental damage to a parked car affects your insurance rates.

After you hit a parked car, the first thing you should do is check to see if anyone is injured. If there are any injuries, call 911 and wait for help to arrive.Hitting a Parked Car Affects Your Insurance Rates

If there are no injuries, move your car out of the way of traffic and then call the police. Be sure to tell the police officer that you hit a parked car and provide the make, model, and license plate number of the other car. The police will create a report that will be helpful when you file an insurance claim.

Once you’ve reported the accident to the police, you’ll need to contact your insurance company. It’s important to remember that not all accidents are considered equal in the eyes of insurers.

Accidental damage to a parked car is typically seen as less severe than accidents that occur while the car is in motion, so your rates may be affected if you hit a parked car.

Your insurer may also require you to take defensive driving courses or increase your deductible before coverage resumes.

What Is a “Chargeable” Accident?

A chargeable accident is one that can result in an increase in your automobile insurance premium. This generally refers to an incident where you were more than 50% at fault and caused:

  • Damage to property, such as another vehicle or a person’s fence.
  • You and your passengers are covered by the same policy, which covers bodily injury or death.

Some jurisdictions may describe a chargeable accident as a monetary amount. For example, in Minnesota, a chargeable accident is defined as an accident for which the auto insurance company paid more than $500 under bodily injury liability, collision, or property damage coverage, with some exceptions.

In some states, like Massachusetts, a chargeable accident is one where someone has to pay more than $1,000 for property damage, collision coverage, or bodily injury (if the driver is more than 50% at fault and driving a private passenger vehicle).

What Should You Do After You Hit A Parked Car?

Following hitting a stationary vehicle, the next step is up to you. The first thing you should do is check for damage to the other car if applicable. There’s a good chance that if you drive slowly enough, you didn’t hurt the other automobile.

Bumpers, on the other hand, are designed to collapse. This is a safety feature that helps protect passengers from injury in the event of a full-speed collision. It is simple to demolish another car’s bumper at low speeds.

If your vehicle has been damaged, the worst thing you can do is drive away and hope no one noticed. Hit-and-run incidents may result in hefty penalties and jail time. Rather than doing so, follow these guidelines:

  1. Check to see if anyone was in the other vehicle and if they are injured.
  2. If you are trapped, call for assistance right away. In most states, if someone is hurt or the damage to property reaches a certain amount, you must report the incident to the cops.
  3. If the vehicle is empty, stay and look for the car’s owner.
  4. If you can’t find the car’s owner, leave a note on the windshield with your name and contact information.
  5. If you find the other motorist, exchange information. Make careful to include your name, insurance contact information (provider, policy number, etc.), and phone number. If you don’t have vehicle insurance, please leave your contact information at least..
  6. Take pictures of the damages.

When you hit a vehicle that is parked, you are usually held responsible. If the automobile you ran into was illegally parked, however, an exception may apply. In this situation, make careful to document it.

Take pictures and gather information from any eyewitnesses (if any exist). You may be required to file a claim against the person whose vehicle you damaged if the other car was illegally parked.

If you’re at blame, your insurance will cover the costs. You can attempt to resolve the issue without calling insurers. However, if the other driver insists on involving insurance firms, nothing can stop it.

What immediate changes will happen to my policy?

The firm reviewed your driving record to calculate your insurance rate if you were recently rated as a new subscriber of an insurance carrier.

Unless you become a high-risk motorist, they may not examine your driving history for the next several years.

Insurance companies receive notice of changes in your driving record increasingly more efficiently.

The same goes for information forwarded to DMV. The DMV is notified of your insurance’s cancellation as soon as it happens. You are not required to turn in your license plates when you cancel your insurance.

You may, however, want to surrender the plates if you do not plan on driving the vehicle or if you will be insuring another vehicle in the future.

I would recommend that you shop around for a new policy and see what is the best fit for you.

There are many different types of policies and coverage options available, so it is important to find one that meets your needs and budget.

Will my rates increase if there were occupants in the car?

What happens if you strike a vehicle that is stopped in traffic? It’s not as simple as fender benders when you hit a car with people inside it.

Even if the collision takes place on private property, emergency responders must be alerted.

Yes, your collision insurance or uninsured motorist coverage will increase after you file a claim if the driver who ran into your parked car has insurance.

Hitting a Parked Car Affects Your Insurance RatesIf the person who damaged your parked car is identified and insured, you can go through their property damage liability insurance instead.

Even if you are not at fault for an accident, most states allow insurance companies to raise your rate in order to recoup the cost of a claim.

California and Oklahoma are the only exceptions, where insurers are forbidden from increasing your premium unless you’re at fault. In addition, some firms won’t raise premiums for minor non-fault accidents.

If you’ve never filed an SR-22 form or had one denied, the answer is no. If you’re like most individuals who have motor vehicle accidents, though, your insurance rates will go up if a police report has been filed on your behalf.

As a result, whether or not your insurance goes up after your parked car is hit depends on the specifics of the accident, your state, and your insurance company’s policies. To learn more about how much insurance rises after an accident, read WalletHub’s information here.

 

Insurance carriers usually do not offer accident forgiveness in cases of alcohol usage.

If they cancel your policy, you will have to seek high-risk car insurance, which is around 50 per cent more expensive than a standard coverage.

You may even have to take a substance abuse class in addition to the fines associated with the offence.

In short, drinking and driving is not worth the risk, no matter how low your blood alcohol content may be.

Most people are aware that you should never leave the scene of an accident, but many do not know what to do if they hit a parked car.

If you have hit a parked car and there is no damage to either vehicle, it is best to leave a note with your name and contact information.

This way, the owner of the parked car can reach out to you if they notice any damage later on.

If there is damage to either vehicle, it is best to exchange insurance information with the other driver.

You should also take pictures of the damages as well as the location of both vehicles for documentation.

Conclusion

If you’re one of the many drivers who has ever accidentally hit a parked car, you may be wondering what to do next. It’s important to follow the right steps so that you don’t make the situation worse and end up with higher insurance rates.

This article will walk you through the steps of what to do after hitting a parked car and discuss how accidental damage to a parked car affects your insurance rates. After you hit a parked car, the first thing you should do is check to see if anyone was injured.

If there are any injuries, call 911 immediately. Once everyone is safe, move on to step two. One way to keep rates low is by increasing the deductible on your policy. This will lower your premiums.

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